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A chance to get your hands dirty: The Neolithic Landscape of Tinkinswood

The Cardiff University summer season of excavations has drawn to a close as the new academic year approaches. There are, however, plenty of other opportunities to get your hands dirty in South Wales. One new project which looks particularly exciting is the CADW community project at Tinkinswood:

Cadw are working in partnership with Archaeology Wales, the local community, with local schools,and  the Council of British Archaeology.Cardiff University School of History, Archaeology and Religion and the National Museum of Wales are also involved in this exciting project at Tinkinswood and the surrounding area.

The project is running an in-depth community blog, which provides a wealth of background information in English and Welsh:

It gives a good impression of how megalithic tombs like this would have appeared in the past, although originally the capstone and the south side would have been completely covered with an earthen mound. It is set in a sloping valley with views to the south-west towards Barry. The site lies above a small stream, which has cut through the limestone. Geologically it is in an area of Triassic formation. It would have been an attractive place for Early Neolithic activity or settlement, with a water supply close by, soil suitable for cultivation, and with a variety of locally available lithic materials.

Interior of Tinkinswood Neolithic tomb

Interior of Tinkinswood Neolithic tomb

This is a fantastic opportunity to investigate, excavate and preserve one of the Vale of Glamorgan’s most impressive Neolithic monuments. If you are interested  in getting involved then please contact Ffion through twitter or email at ffion[dot]reynolds@wales.gsi.gov.uk

+Matt Nicholas

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About Matt Nicholas

Hello, my name is Matt Nicholas and I'm an archaeologist. I recently finished a PhD at Cardiff University on the analysis of early Anglo-Saxon non-ferrous metals excavated from a group of cemeteries in Suffolk. I grew up in a town called Worksop in North Nottinghamshire. With sites like Creswell Crags and Roche Abbey on my doorstep becoming an archaeologist was an occupational hazard of childhood. I was lucky enough to get my first job excavating an Anglo-Saxon cemetery at Whitby Abbey before studying for a BSc in Archaeological Sciences at the University of Bradford (2000-4). After my undergraduate studies I worked in commercial archaeology for a few years (in locations from Suffolk to Sudan) before studying for an MSc in the Technology and Analysis of Archaeological Material at UCL (2007-8). I then proceeded to spend two years employed at the Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford (where I didn't stab myself with a poisoned arrow and only broke one object). I don’t like pickled beetroot. All posts, comments etc. represent my own personal musings, and are not representative of any past or current professional affiliations.

Discussion

2 thoughts on “A chance to get your hands dirty: The Neolithic Landscape of Tinkinswood

  1. Thanks. This is very helpful information. I m impressed, I need to say. Really hardly ever do I encounter a weblog that’s both educative and entertaining.

    Posted by Jeanie | January 17, 2012, 11:15 am
  2. Glade you have enjoyed it Jeanie 🙂 We have plenty more blogs on the way so please come back soon 🙂

    Posted by Cosmeston Archaeology | January 17, 2012, 12:20 pm

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